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mandela had been elected president the night before, and i had the honor of being the first western journalist that day to shake his hand and sit down and talk with him. mandela showed no bitterness or anger. he was famous for that. no thought of revenge when i asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk, he spoke only of reconciliation and working together. >> our relations with mr. de klerk are fairly good. and he is one of those republicans i hold in high regard. we have had some differences. we have quarreled. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we are able to shake hands and think of the interest of south africa. and he has had that experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with majority in the elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect a government -- as well as governments would re
cast their ballot in the first democratic election. this morning applause for the first black voter. mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all of its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight but now this is a time to heal the old wound and to build a new south africa. ♪ >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary. the voice of his people and more accomplished. >> abc news. >> today following his passing the new south african president, president zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son and our people have lost a father. >> a man whose fighting spirit was matched by his humility and compassion. few hew human beings present either one of those sides in the amount that he did and he had both. >> absolutely. [ dad ] ah! lily... she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains an
in 1993p. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. so help me god. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell, this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011 he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle o
on obama care, something that really unifies the party. we've got one party in the midterm election that quite frankly wince everything imaginable, governor races, we have a huge opportunity in the senate. i think we've been wildly successful in midterms and we've had a hard time in presidential elections. >> what about you've got five senators who are being primaried by the tea party, including the minority leader, mitch mcconnell. that's sort of a problem when you have one faction of the party who is feeding that, ted cruz is feeding that. are you going to support mitch mcconnell? >> of course i support the leader. scott walker was primaried by a congressman named mark newman. ron johnson was primaried by about three republicans who were running, but the cream rose to the top. it works. and i think we're a big enough party to have all these opinions in the same room, debating it out. and i think that we're going to do really well. >> one last question, i'm sorry newt. i know i'm hogging the time. what about chris christie? he was just reelected less than a month ago. part of the g
of nervous house democrats facing re-election next year. joining me now for our daily fix, chris cillizza, and nbc white house correspondent peter alexander. take it away, you guys. let's talk about what the president is trying to do. peter, you first. >> andrea, between your voice, my leaf blower, and what chris has, this could be an interesting next couple minutes. we're going to do our best to get through it. you heard the focus speaking a short time ago. the focus of his remarks less specific to health care than they were to economic opportunities for all americans right now. the white house and this president believes there's a connection between health care security and between economic security as well for americans. a short time from now, about an hour from now, the president is going to be hosting a youth summit event taking place here at the white house. he's going to make remarks specific to the impact on young americans and the affordable care act. the point that white house aides have repeated before, about 6 in 10 americans who sign up will be able to get health care for les
. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly
election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> africa. >> reporter: -- nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world. a fighter. a visionary. the voice of his people. and a moral compass for us all. >> i am the product of africa. and her long cherished dream, of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of her children may play in the sun. >> his life, dedicated to that dream. abc's christiane amanpour joins us now. you covered the struggle in south africa. his early days as president. one of the points you make, is he kept the country together in a time it could easily have been torn apart. >> absolutely. in fact, his people say that it is a miracle that they pulled off that first election. just as he came out of prison, there was still terrible violence from the apartheid, the zulus from the extremist white parties. there were ki
it was a very big public boycott of the election and we saw police beating down demonstrators and the brutality of that government and there was in return a response to the united states. that rekindled the anti-apartheid movement in this country. it started small and grew and grew. on the berkley campus it went from a handful of students to being thousands of students and faculty and staff and i. >> were you having conversations with your parents explaining to your parents why you were doing this? >> many of us did. particularly when we were arrested and we were seen on tv confronting the police. these were tense times and it was a bit different from the 60's. it was different in that ours was a movement in solidarity with the people in south africa. we were keenly aware we had our own issues namely racism and other oppression, we were focused on south africa and the university's invotemen investme. and many of us didn't want to distract by making it police brutality and keep the focus on south africa. we managed to keep it prod and managed to prevent the pola polarzation that you saw on many
for the bush white house. the election of barack obama, the kind of change towards a multiracial society that he saw in south africa as well. it was not just south africa that nelson mandela was revolutionary. it was his moral stature around the world and the way that he used it that made a difference. was tremendous respect from leaders around the world for nelson mandela. next year. are coming ines from presidents of this country. george w. bush, "we join the people of south africa and around the world and celebrity the life of nelson mandela. he was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he left the world with dignity and grace and our world is better off because of his example," that from president george w. bush a short time ago. jonathan karl, certainly president obama made aware of the news, the loss this afternoon. have we heard anything yet from the president? >> the white house is well aware of this, something we have been tracking a long time. no official statement yet. was a towering influence on president obama, inspiration. if you look now at the scre
democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i remember one joke he used to tell when a group of journalist west were gathered in his house and we were sitting talking to him before the interview and he joked about how when he was in jail and the antiapartheid protests started he was told by someone a lot of the kids in london when they were protesting believed that free was his first name because free nelson mandela was the postcard placard they were holding up. t
and iran. it is titled -- there is this story from "the weekly standard" focusing on the midterm elections -- next is james joining us this morning from valley village, california. i don't really consider myself an independent or republican or democrat. i see myself as a humanitarian. being that i dedicated my life to traveling the world, i don't see where any types of war or weapons is the solution to anything. next is kathleen from texas. caller: good morning. i am a military mother. quit the military. he trains people for three times what he makes as a private contractor. america is in decline because we have outsourced our wealth. 40% of americans make under 20,000 a year. torture and not outsourced every, -- and outsource slavery. more americans than al qaeda on 9/11 and 10 times the amount of iraq ease and saddam, and he gets a library. that is why america is a joke. i love you, steve. host: kathleen from texas. continue our feature, first ladies, influence and image. you can watch the program every monday beginning at 9:00 eastern time here on c-span. all of the programs from martha
can't or you're a bully. i think the best debate i ever had in my four elections is against a woman and i did so well at the end that i walked out going -- she was tough. she was attacking me on every single issue. it got personal. very angry. i sort of -- i brushed it off. but it was so bad that i was walking out and they were booing her and i walked out. i felt sorry for her. right? even though she had been attacking he in whole time boy that didn't go well. the next day in the newspaper the screaming headlines were that, you know, i was a bully and it was terrible. i never raised my voice because it just went so bad for tonally it was a surprising and jarring thing. the next day when you run a campaign against a woman, especially if you're a 6'4" man you got to take extra, extra care. >> right. but there's also a ton of studies and information and evidence that shows women are negatively portrayed when they express their views firmly. i have some sympathy with how men have to address women and you can't retaliate in a way you would against a guy but women are always being seen --
's why he was elected not as the first african elected but the first democratically elected president of south africa. that's important. democracy and justice ask truth made a big difference. >> robin, i keep coming back to this and mentioned a couple times, i'm fascinated how he began to see himself and it was critical for him to see -- start to see himself as an african first, not just as a member of his ethnic group in the area that he was born as a hossa but as an african and in that way was able to overcome efforts by the white regime because they wanted groups to be divided. they wanted didn't ethnic groups, zulus against hossas to divide and conquer and rule them. >> absolutely. he grew up as a proud timbu, so there was a subgroup he identified with but when he came to johannesburg to work and train as a lawyer, he identified more with the politics of the african national congress. what is key with this is that nelson mandela was not only prague mat tick politician but tactic and will very much understood the power of symbols. so for him, it was quite useful to be scene as an a
that were criticizing him. nelson mandela, i was on election observer in 1994, and mandela was being attacked by black nationalists that felt he sold out and de klerk by africaners that felt he sold out. they had to fight inside their own base to have this reconciliation which makes them even greater figures. how do you deal with having to balance those that are with you, think you're too soft, those that think you're too hard and find a way to go down the middle. that's where greatness is achieved. >> every revolutionary man or woman has that great challenge. >> absolutely. >> wow. >> let's look back to the 1961 when the 42-year-old activist gave his first televised interview. >> i went to see the man who organized this, a 42-year-old african lawyer nelson mandela the most dynamic man in south africa today. the police were hunting for him at the time but african nationalists arranged for me to meet him at his hide out. this is mandela's first television interview. i asked him what it was that the african really wanted. >> the africans require one franchise of one-man/one-vote. >> do
's in charge of the republican governor's association which tries to get republicans elected. yesterday chris christie tried to set the record straight. >> mr. asterino hasn't told me or anyone else he's run for governor. i won't support someone who won't say they are running or not. it's much ado about nothing. my guess is some people, irresponsible folks who are trying touring him to run to try to create an image that, you know, i'm urging him to run. i'm not urging him to do anything. he came and asked for time specifically asked for time with me and mary, for he and his wife to meet with the two of us the impact it has on our family. they have young children like we do and that's what the whole conversation was about. when we have a republican nominee for new york then i'll support the republican nominee for new york. >> i had no idea. as he said i was at the republican governor's association. he's westchester, one 2-1 margin as a conservative in a democratic area. but everybody there knew he was running. i don't understand the confusion here. he talked to ed koch and everybody else. >> w
chris christie is forcefully denying that he's flipped his position on immigration. he ran his 2013 re-election campaign in support of legislation to provide instate tuition for young, undocumented students. the legislation commonly known as the dream act is about to be sent to his desk by the state legislature. but now, the governor says it goes too far and is refusing to sign it. on sunday, "the star ledger," new jersey's largest newspaper, accused christie of flip-flopping. the editorial board cited his 2016 presidential ambitions. >>> the republican-led house is expected to approve a ten-year extension today to an existing ban on plastic guns. these are weapons made from so-called 3d printers that go undetected by metal detectors. democrats say they'll back the plan, but some say they favor making that ban permanent. >>> washington, d.c.'s mayor could have a bumpy road towards re-election. embattled democrat vincent bray said monday that he'll run for a second term next year. four of his high-level aides have pleaded guilty to felonies, including two who received more than $260,000 in illeg
train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know, when you were around him, you felt very special. he was joyful. he had a sense of humor, but there was this dignity about him, this strength about him. i will always remember his grace and his courage. >> and to donna's point, john, i want to bring you in. she talks about him being a giant. .headlines, these are one of the days you are looking at the headlines. "usa today" saying the death of a giant. you were there when nelson mandela was inaugurated in 1994. you've also covered many world events but you will never forget that moment. why? >> professionally it was the most powerful thing i've ever seen in my life. i say professionally because i carve out a special spot for my children. if you think of the day of inauguration, u.s. vice president al gore led the delegation. the ceremony was outside in what they call the union building, parliament building. it was the most dramatic, powerful moment of south african military brass, white generals
, the first elected black president of this country but affectionally called ta-ta, father in tribal language. all through the night singing, dancing outside his house in johannesburg. we were there a couple of months ago when mandela was near death at the pretoria hospital. we saw the outpouring of emotion there. there's going to be a whole lot more over the coming days in his country. back to you. >> indeed. a giant for justice. nelson mandela. thank you very much, greg. >> word came out in the middle of the night so a lot of people did not know. i was actually on with neil cavuto. i said am i boring him? he said the 95-year-old nelson mandela passed away. we did get word when he left the hospital to go home and we thought that could be the end. we thought it could be just that. >> a tribute page, on twitter people expressing their love and thanks to a man that certainly is an icoo and a hero to so many. >> and he was a hero to the president of the united states. he was a huge inspiration for him when he saw what one man could do to inspire so many, he decided to get into politics. he said
who need religious voters in these primaries or, you know, in national elections as well. >> well, we know it's important, but we also know the other side. that is the concern that someone would legislate based on their religion, which happens to not be the religion of the constituent in some cases. and that is the larger, i think what you were saying, the conversation is not the floating book shelf cross thing, it's a larger conversation. >> it's the content of how you legislate. >> absolutely. all right, domenico, thank you very much. greatly appreciate it. and a reminder, chris matthews has a one-on-one interview with president obama today. it's part of the "hardball" college tour live from american university. the full interview airs tonight at 7:00 eastern on "hardball." >>> still ahead, well, he's back. he never left, but anyway, toronto mayor rob ford responds to new reports that he may have tried to buy the infamous video that allegedly shows him smoking crack. the offer, according to court documents, may have been $5,000 and a car. that according to drug dealers who allegedly
to the peaceful transition that it was when he came out and then the success it was to see him elected as south africa's first black president. >> i know you have so many personal stories but one is at that time right before he was elected or after he was and you said you couldn't go to the inauguration? >> right. this was my second time in his presence. and i couldn't get to -- third time actually. i saw him when he was here in america. but my son was graduating from emory university. and i said to almost-president mandela i was so sorry i couldn't be at the inauguration. i mean, i had worked toward this all my career. but i'd worked toward my son's graduation, you know. and he was like -- he became the father as opposed to the almost president and leaned into him and his whole demeanor changed and he said, well, of course you have to be there. you can interview me any time. i said can i take you up on that. >> and you certainly did. explain for everybody who zelda was in his life. >> she was an african woman. he reached into the african community and had zelda as one of his principle gate kee
nobel peace prize and became the first black president and nation's first democratically elected president and touched millions of lives around the world. mandela compares to dr. king and gandhi as nonviolent agents of change and progress. pope francis said the sted fast commitment in proving dignity and forging a new south africa built on firm foundations on nonviolence should inspire generations to put it in front of their political aspirations. plans are already under way for memorials and of course his state funeral. here in america, flags are lowered at the capitol and the white house. and candlelight vigils are planned for tonight. president obama, who was inspired by mandela's life and visited with his family this past summer will be among hundreds of world leaders heading to pretoria to honor him. michelle kosinski is outside mandela's home and where the official memorial service will be held. it's 10:00 p.m. and crowds have been swelling for 24 hours. what's the feeling there? >> reporter: that's right. a lot of people didn't even find out what it happened until midnight
the population and ensure stability that would then lead to election. >> our correspondent is in central african report and we have this report on the violence that has taken over bangui. >> reporter: gunfire echos through the city. [ sirens ] >> reporter: some say this was an attempted coup d'État. security forces called celica. the streets of this once bustling city are almost deserted. those who venture out risk ending up like this. it's not clear how many people have died in this mortuary we counted 25 bodies. this woman lost her son. she didn't want to give us her name. >> i don't know what is happening in central african republic right now. if you go in you see people on the ground like animals who have been slaughtered. with the state of the country, where can i go? >> this is where most of the injured have been brought. most have wounds, women are being treated along side government soldiers. [ sobbing ] >> this woman asked god, why has this happened? there christian and muslim victims in this conflict. muslims and christians used to live in this country peacefully. but hatred and viole
at of some sort? >> the next one for the 2013 elections. thank you. last time i checked the is the commander in chief. and of the executive branch. that is called a leader. that is exactly what he was elected to do, to be the leader. style. once again he is passing the buck. the blame starts with them. >> here is something else that the president said in the same interview, invest in b.c. tweeted this out. lou: i can't wait for this. >> ", government is not somebody else. government is us. we have the capacity to change it. what that tells you is when this president up in his mouth, what comes out is just black bird. you cannot take it seriously. >> that is the foundation of the very strong, pass an income and personal philosophy. >> well, in a way it is between of the president wants not to eliminate government departments some of them should be. the thing so why does he propose that we not eliminate them. we know that we want to increase the size of government, hire more people and give government more power and take it away from congress or if congress does not go along, the federal gover
: i hope the country will elect a new government and a new noble president. people who will serve this nation properly. and i hope the blood of our youth won't be spilled. >> they want the resignation of yanukovych and closer ties with the european union. they've occupied government buildings but they now face a deadline to leave by tuesday morning. no one's in a mood to give in. >> translator: i want a new government that listens to the people and doesn't treat us like animals. >> translator: we are here to fight for our rights, so that our kids are brought up in a good country without corruption and where everything's fair. >> yanukovych believes that he has enough support to survive with backing from moscow. the protestors realize that this crisis has now reached a crucial moment. tim friend, al jazeera kiev. >> tensions mount in tield after the -- thailand after the party's main government resigned. at least five people have been killed and hundreds injured since massive antigovernment protestprotests have begun last. calling on the prime minister to resign. >>> winter sto
after the main opposition party resigned. the party says the people no longer accept the elected government. five have been killed and hundreds hurt since protests began last month. they are demanding the prime minister resign. >> protesters in ukraine toppled a statue of lenin. several statues have been removed from kiev. this is the largest demonstration by far. many are outraged that the government is rejecting talks with europe to keep close ties with russia. tim friend has more. >> it they poured into square they know the demonstration has to be big and loud to sustain the pressure on viktor yanukovych. on the edge. crowd young men prepared tactics for the worst outcome, another violent confrontation with riot police. a few streets away officers lined up. last week there was chaos, many injured in a place charge. now there's a standoff. riot police at the ready at one end of the street with shields and trudgeons, and at the other, protesters with their flags. they are waiting in preparation. everyone hopes there won't be the repeat of last week's violence. a solitary priest
the clarity of message or the attraction with the president. in 2004 they were calling specifically for re-elections. this time they want him to go or the government to step down for a new government. they are talking about obstruction measures, they want a change in the political system. these are ideas that are difficult to force concessions on. these are sitting with vladimir putin on friday. people want to know what he was discussing. this has been an this is a choice between europe or a choice between some kind of soviet union 2.4, they russia has a corrupting influence on the country. we'll see how things progress throughout the day. >> thank you for joining us from kiev. a car bomb attack from a police station in columbia killed eight people. it happened in a town south-east of the booingo tea. fighters known as farc are suspected of being behind the attack. leaders and officials are engaged in talks, trying to end a 50 year war that is taking 200,000 lives. >> 72 years ago this weekend pearl harbour was attacked. it was known as the day of infamy. 400 japanese plants bombarded -- planes bom
. but getting back to president obama, it's almost a full year, jon, into his re-election and you've been talking about how difficult his presidency has been, specifically over the past year. if you compare it to recent presidents before him, their approval rating at this very same time, president clinton and reagan both doing far better than president obama at this time. george w. bush was slightly lower at 37%. but this is the same president who it seemed could do no wrong when he was re-elected. ari often reminds me that in politics things can move very slow and they can also move very fast. >> only ari knows that? oh. >> and former white house adviser spoke to this on this week last week wanting it to move quickly. let's take a listen. >> people trust this president. i think there's been numbers all over the place. i'm confident in a few months from now those trust numbers are going to come up. i think his approval number will come up. >> that's obviously what every democrat wants. jon, it seems like this is a year the administration is wanting to put behind them very quickly. >> yeah
the election of obama. >> here is former pennsylvania senator rick santorum comparing the fight against apartheid in south africa to the battle over obama care. >> he was fighting against some great injustice. i would make the argument we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that has taken over and is controlling people's lives and obama care is front and center in that. >> ryan, what gives? >> i think we have to add apartheid -- >> f.w. de klerk, such a better person than mitch mcconnell. >> we have to add apartheid to that list of issues you shouldn't compare in modern american politics -- >> right. naziism, slavery, apartheid. >> there are issues that were unique historically and no matter how bad you think things are in american politics right now, comparisons are never going to be apt. >> nelson mandela supported universal health care. i think the comparison, like the pope, i think the comparison is kind of -- >> i would tell you this. i think neither side should be using the man, a dead man, deceased man we are honori
. >> the arkansas democrat is considered the most vulnerable senator up for re-election n year. in the new spot, he wants voters to know he's a man of faith. >> the bible teaches us no one has all the answers, only god does. and neither political party is always right. this is my compass, my north star. it gives me comfort and guidance to do what's best for arkansas. >> the campaign won't say how much tv time they bought, marco rubio's super pac launches a six figure ad buy. >>> hillary clinton can read a little easier. elizabeth warren tells the boston harold she is not running for president in 2016. >>> the great people at the onion are having fun with out jog fair michael bloomberg. this time they are poking fun at the stop and kiss policy. >> the policy allows officers to kick anyone they think looks suspicious has been a subject of criticism for those who say it's a violation of privacy and breech of constitutional rights. >> every time i go out and i see a cop, i'm ready for him to come up and ask me questions and give me a little kiss just because of the color of my skin. i mean you don't se
in the big apple. new york mayor elect bill deblass yo announced bill bratton as new yorks's police commissioner. he ran the police force 20 years ago and he vowed to repair the relationship between officers and minority neighborhoods amid the nypd's controversial stop and frisk program, a tactic he has embraced in the pass while the incoming mayor has criticized it, bratton said a book he read when he was 9 will guide him on his new beat. >> i checked this thing out so often that i don't think anybody else in boston ever saw it. it is a book about the new york city police department of 1956 and i loved the title "your police." in this city, i want every new yorker to talk about their police, my police, with respect and with confidence that they are going to be respected. >> bratton has led the boston and los angeles police departments. >>> pope francis bringing another big change to the catholic church. the pontiff just launching a commission to prevent priests from sexually abusing young children and to help children who were victims of abuse. the new pope has faced some criticism
a miracle, alex. i was here 23 years ago after after madiba was released but well before he was elected president and at a time when this country was on a razor's edge. there was some violence in the townships stirred by the security forces, and one be wasn't certain which direction the country would go in. i remember when madiba went on television, compelled his brothers and sisters to make peace and reconcile themselves and to be here 23 years later to see black and white working side by side, to not only forge a democracy but a strong economy, as well is absolutely stirring and you know at this moment is possible because of the spirit nelson mandela. >> yes, he was really a man who he inspired and he really kept the country together almost as if a type of a glue, and there are worries about south africa going into a tail spin financially and even socially now that he has passed. are you at all concerned about that? >> no, i'm absolutely not, alex. i will tell you that these are resill entpeople. if you could survive the oppressive decades of apartheid and come forward as the leading
trying to run away from this because they're worried about the 2014 elections. let's not forget this was a double lie. so not only do you have the president saying that people can keep their health insurance plans they wanted to and obamacare can't change that you. had the senate and the congress voting, democrats voting against an amendment in 2009 that would have allowed people to keep their plans. so for them to now backtrack and say, well, we never said that, and the president -- we tried to convey to him that wasn't the case. they had an opportunity to fix this years ago and they're not doing it and they're not doing it now either, and they can't fix it unless they're willing to be honest and say, we lied to you, which is what they did, and we're sorry, but this is the way it is now, and it's the law, to quote in the white house. >> covering fannies. should say, we goofed. it would be stating the obvious, but too late for that. all right. very good seeing you again. thank you. >> good to see you. >> in the fight of her life but mary lan drew says she does not regret the vot
in democracy and becoming the country's first democratically elected president. on this street today, you will find restaurants and bars and middle class south africans spending their disposable income in a place where it wouldn't have been possible decades ago. and indeed, this will also be the location of the first official memorial service for nelson mandela on tuesday at the stadium which is also significant because it was the last location he made an appearance in public during the closing ceremonies for the world cup. so as is true in many other locations in the country, these celebrations will continue. it's just day one of ten days of a country thanking one man for bringing transformative change to millions. >> it's after midnight already there and there are still a lot of folks. are the crowds getting bigger or smaller, and what about security? >> reporter: these crowds are growing as people come and go. there are crowds going up and down the street, as you can hear behind me, singing. but as far as security, the atmosphere is jovial. this morning, i was in zimbabwe on assignment
vote to get elected and make his presidency seem cool and all of that. and the real problem for him is, look, his numbers may go up among young people before the end of his presidency, but he's never going to get back that sort of cool image that he once had because it's very difficult to get that image back. that's something that once you've lost that aura of magic, you can't get it back. and that's going to be a real problem for him because that means he's going to have to deliver and not just used glorified rhetoric that people used to buy. once you're skeptical of someone, it's very hard to be a true believer again. jon: and wouldn't you agree, jonah, that this younger generation that is the most tech-savvy and the most comfortable with internet sign-ups for everything is going to be very leerily of all of the -- leerily that they've hard about all of the problems and the security concerns which we were told yesterday on this program still have not been addressed. >> yeah. look, the whole point of obamacare was to make people feel more secure, and the overall effect of obamacare ha
could turn into freezing rain a little bit later on today. alex? >> okay. all of our big elected names are expected back in town now. the house and the senate back on the roll call tomorrow. so what are the key issues of the many that they're expected to take up before adjourning for the year? >> well, alex, it's interesting. i don't want to sound too optimistic here, but all signs are pointing to the fact that they might actually get a deal on the budget. that deal might include scaling back some of those sequester cuts, finding a little bit of deficit reduction. here's the key thing to focus on, though, right now, alex. the tone. there doesn't seem to be an appetite for another government shutdown. that, of course, bodes well for the economy and washington in general. take a listen to what two lawmakers had to say earlier today. >> keep the budget caps in place, not raise taxes, which is important during this weak economy, and actually avoid a government shutdown. so i'm hopeful that even by the end of this week we'll be able to come together and achieve that. >> i certainly hope as
. >> president clinton who was in the white house when mandel was elected president of south africa. the two developed a close personal relationship. bill clinton says, quote, all of us are living in a better world because of the life that madiba lived. he proved that there is freedom in forgiving that a big heart is better than a closed mind and that life's real victories must be shared. >> jimmy carter also saying the following. to think of their parents and grandparents the different world they are seeing. we will have more coverage of nelson mandela's legacy still to come on "early start." >>> we are following the vast majority of the united states dealing with the effects of a deep freeze, including major travel headaches. more than 500 flights have been precanceled. so bad they are canceling them before they are supposed to take off! they have been canceled around the country because of the bitter weather. >> getting around by car not easier. icy conditions call that seven vehicle wreck along interstate 540 in northern arkansas. four people tenth so the hospital and we are told their i
for reconciliation and forgiveness. four years after his release he was elected president. nelson mandela was 95 years old. he had been ill on and off for more than a year. he passed peacefully surrounded by his family. >>> students will probably be wide awake at one south bay community college. in the next half hour we will show you why students have to deal with the freezing cold even when they are inside the classroom. >>> and $7 for a gallon of milk? it might sound ridiculous now but prices could reach record highs next month. the washington stalemate that could wreck your budget. >>> born. right now we are looking at a commute that is still doing very well as we put up a live picture of highway 4. it looks good here but i will tell you where it is beginning to show some signs of slowing. >>> outside our doors this morning. joined by record breaking temperatures once again in some areas. we will compare the numbers and in the extended forecast for your bay area weekend rain and local snow. i love having a free checked bag with my united mileageplus explorer card. i've saved $75 in checked ba
of the union speech, but in the coming months election cycle. >> let's continue with gloria bor borger. what is the president attempting to establish today? >> one is an issue of poverty and inequality. he started his career organizing poor people in chicago. this is an issue i thought he would come back to in this term and he has. the other part of this is look, this is not much different from the conversation we had in 2012 about -- it's equality stupid. he is taking it back to the issues of expanding for the middle class, that republicans didn't have a good answer for in 2012. >> i think you heard it we have all heard it. i think this is a way to lay the groundwork for ib inequality issues. what you do with medicare, medicaid, and i think he sort of is dipping his toe into that now a little bit early. >> i do think that cornell is right. this is a base that has been demoralized in the last few weeks and months because of the debacle that has been the obama care rollout. it is important to republican that to listen to that speech today, you would have to think he has not been president for
election papers. he is still under investigation, something sherwood equated to a wet mattress hanging over his campaign. how tough would it be for the mayor to run with a wet mattress hanging over his head? >> it won't be easy, there's no question about that. the reality is that many of the people who are convinced that the 2010 campaign was corrupt have already decided that they're not going to be able to support mayor gray. so to my way of thinking, he is actually benefiting from all of these other high-profile candidates getting into the race. the more widely the vote is divided, the better it is for him. he may do what harry thomas used to do when he was running and win by 30% of the vote because all the anti incumbent vote has been divide among so many candidates. >> bowser saying now that he's running he will have to answer questions, tommy wells saying he doesn't deserve a second chance because of the shadow of the 2010 campaign. >> a lot of that, i think, is campaign talk on these candidates running against mayor gray. but i think a lot -- i heard tommy wells the other day. he's pu
on patent reform since i was elected and took office in 2011. this is not new. we have been working on this legislation if not for several months at least several weeks where it's been up on the internet to see, for our colleagues to read. i'm tired of hearing here in congress we need more time and more time to do something. if businesses operated the way congress did, they would be out of business. finally, this is a quintessential example of us getting off our did you have and doing something in reasonable amount of time that's going to help small business owners because, as we stand here and speak, more and more are being put out of business because of trolls. i yield back. thank you. the chair: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: madam speaker, how much time remains? the chair: the gentleman from michigan has 4 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. conyers: thank you. i am pleased now to call a senior member of the committee, our friend from north carolina, mel watt, who has worked on this assiduously for a number of years, the rema
-sisi of egypt. he is responsible for the first democratically elected government of egypt. he got nearly 500,000 voters. turkey's prime minister came in second. si pop singer miley cyrus came in third. the offical person a year will be selected by times editors and announced on wednesday. and >> that is it for this morning. we hope you will join us back here on monday. here is a picture of how the world is are remembering and nelson mandela. >> announcer: today on an all-new "dr. phil." >> kayla phillips says she was stopped after buying a handbag. >> dr. phil: you feel like this was racial profiling. >> absolutely. >> the cop reached for his gun. >> i said we're actors, not criminals. >> i said are you doing this because we're black? a couple seconds later, we were handcuffed. >> dr. phil: you stop me, handcuff me, you better have a good reason. >> dr. phil: let's do it. >> have a good show, everybody. here we go. >> dr. phil: i hate to see people suffering. you've hurt long enough. >> stand by, dr. phil. >> dr. phil: i'm going to get you the help you need. this is going to be a changing da
. frankly, it was that refusal that led to his defeat and re-election. the judge, the person who prosecuted michael's case, a guy named ken anderson, became a judge in that county. he pled guilty to criminal contempt for hiding exculpatory everyday in michael's case. he did ten days in jail, he was disbarred. now we're having an audit conducted by the criminal defense lawyers to see if he had done this in other instances. so michael's case really is of enormous importance, and he himself is such an extraordinary individual, that i think there is no one in america, you know, white, black, or brown, that couldn't identify with the story of leaving for work first thing in the morning and then all of a sudden by the afternoon, you know, your wife's been beaten to death in front of your 3 1/2-year-old child. and you're convicted of that murder. it's just unreal dream, as the documentary so well puts it. >> which airs tomorrow night. more i get word on michael, you brought up ken anderson. i have to read the statement from his attorney. mr. anderson has not been and will never be prosecuted for a
bash on how. >> reporter: this is exactly what republicans want to avoid in the next election -- >> if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> reporter: that comment not only cost republican todd aiken a senate seat, it knocked all republicans off message. now, republicans are training house candidates to communicate better with women and steer clear of such gaffes. >> trying to get them to be more sensitive. >> reporter: cnn is told that gop media training sessions, first reported by politico, include tutorials on how to avoid foot-in-mouth responses when talking about sensitive topics like abortion and rape. remember this republican fate-sealing moment? >> even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that god intended to happen. >> reporter: mitt romney lost female voters by 12%, the biggest gap in history. this sure didn't help. >> and brought us a whole binders full of women. >> reporter: part of the gop problem in congress? so few female gop lawmakers. out of 232 republican house members,
're heading into a midterm does that indicate this could be a tough issue for some democrats in tough re-election battles. >> it could. this is not an issue swing voters are necessarily focused on. this is about the democratic base, social justice, issues that rile up the base. to some extent, i think the president is trying to get enthusiasm from his base. you have today and the last couple of weeks protests around the cover over the issue of minimum wage and fast food. >> timely. >> this is timely, cutting edge, coupled with a push to raise the minimum wage which appears to the base. there are political risks for the president. he's framing this as a moral issue. you have a fascinating dynamic. the super rich and the middle class, stock market all-time but poverty also at an all-time high. >> the united states still manufacturers more than any other country in the world, something that people lose site of because of what's happened with china. it's easy to say raise the minimum wage. another thing to get it done politically. >> yes. >> isn't the real challenge finding ways to get higher paying
was elected the first black president of south africa. colin powell was talking earlier in the show, i was sad whe i heard the news b i immediately got a smile on my face thinking about this man's legacy and what he did for the worl >> the fact that he lived. he lived suc an incredible life. my sister worked in south africa actually and one thing people haven't talked about as much is his stance on hiv/aids. it changed the entire continent and not the world. >> no black president i that countrwas talking about it. >> and they were saying he wasn't a disease. >> he had a son that died of aids. richard ele is outside mandela's home where crowds have been gatheng to mourn but also to celebrate mandela'slife. richard, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. we are in johannesburg outside of mandela's me, t same home where he dd l lt night and since his passing hundreds of people have been coming here. ey have been laying flowers and singing and dancing. a very celebratory mood. perhaps mandels greatest legacy is that of reconciliation and that is represented today. there are black south africans
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